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Old 07-24-2019, 12:28 PM   #11
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Great deal! I always liked the suitcase. Had one for 25 years. Once I got the collet adapter, I stopped using the k50. Honesty, I’m not sure if I was putting to much torque on the 5/8 cable, but I never had one snap on me. I always used the Tim the tool man approach,,, more power must be better! rrr rrr
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Old 07-25-2019, 03:30 PM   #12
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I bought this old style k-60 off Craigslist today. Got it for $85!
It appears to be in good shape besides the paint peeling on top. I tested it at his house and the motor sounds smooth. There is no grinding when the lever is pushed.
I've used the k-60sp before so I know what that's capable of doing. Can the people that have/had both chime in?
The biggest lines I'd use it on would be 4" and 120' or less. I currently have a k-7500 in my van but if I can conserve space and weight by using this that would be great. I also have a k-50 knockoff in my van. It would be even better if this would replace both. I know it can run 5/8" and 7/8" cable.










You are in Virginia. Do you find that the sewer lines on customers' properties are deep? How do you like the K-60 on main line stoppages? The reason that I ask is because a lot of plumbers and drain men feel that a drum machine is much more powerful than a sectional machine.


I don't have much experience on drum machines. Although with my limited use of a big heavy Spartan machine, it was a beast. Big heavy 300 lb. machine with lots of torque.

I'm wondering how you like the sectional machine {K-60} for heavy roots on a main line.
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Old 07-25-2019, 05:25 PM   #13
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I bought this old style k-60 off Craigslist today. Got it for $85!
It appears to be in good shape besides the paint peeling on top. I tested it at his house and the motor sounds smooth. There is no grinding when the lever is pushed.
I've used the k-60sp before so I know what that's capable of doing. Can the people that have/had both chime in?
The biggest lines I'd use it on would be 4" and 120' or less. I currently have a k-7500 in my van but if I can conserve space and weight by using this that would be great. I also have a k-50 knockoff in my van. It would be even better if this would replace both. I know it can run 5/8" and 7/8" cable.










You are in Virginia. Do you find that the sewer lines on customers' properties are deep? How do you like the K-60 on main line stoppages? The reason that I ask is because a lot of plumbers and drain men feel that a drum machine is much more powerful than a sectional machine.


I don't have much experience on drum machines. Although with my limited use of a big heavy Spartan machine, it was a beast. Big heavy 300 lb. machine with lots of torque.

I'm wondering how you like the sectional machine {K-60} for heavy roots on a main line.
I love my drum machines for main lines. I own a Ridgid k-7500 and a Duracable DM-175. They both have lots of torque.

The Duracable is quieter and is a direct drive but it's also heavier, I'd guess by about 20 lbs.

The Ridgid feels like it's stronger. I also find it easier to maneuver into tight spaces.

I've done well over a thousand main lines with each machine. I run 11/16" hollow core cable in each. I've run up to 200 feet of cable with each one which I think is about the limit.

The k-60 I haven't used yet. I've only run a couple dozen with the k-60sp at a company I worked for. It is a bit different since you're not trying to torque through everything like with the drum machines. Don't get me wrong, it's got enough torque to mess up your wrist if you're not careful. I just found myself easing into the clogs with the sectional.

The main reasons I got the k-60 is to save weight and save my back, haha. I have a jetter for jobs with really bad roots. I've opened up numerous lines and cleaned out roots with my 5/8" sectional cables, a chain knocker and a Ridgid 18v drill. I have no doubt this machine should be able to do at least the same. Plus with the extra RPM from this machine I should be able to de-scale a lot better than with the drum machines.

Once I put it to use I'll write up my review on it. I can definitely recommend the k-60sp though. That's actually what I was looking for when I found mine. Or, if you really want torque, get a 1500. That machine is a beast but overkill for what I do. I can't recall the last time I snaked a line over 6".

I find most of the sewer lines in my area average about 9 feet. I've had to repair some as deep as 20 and some as shallow as a foot.
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Old 07-25-2019, 10:10 PM   #14
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You are in Virginia. Do you find that the sewer lines on customers' properties are deep? How do you like the K-60 on main line stoppages? The reason that I ask is because a lot of plumbers and drain men feel that a drum machine is much more powerful than a sectional machine.


I don't have much experience on drum machines. Although with my limited use of a big heavy Spartan machine, it was a beast. Big heavy 300 lb. machine with lots of torque.

I'm wondering how you like the sectional machine {K-60} for heavy roots on a main line.



It depends on the cable it was designed to run more than whether it is sectional or drum. Drum units always run solid core cable so I am sure they are set up to give more torque to the cable. But I don't see why a sectional designed for use with solid core cable wouldn't be just as torquey. If it's meant for hollow cable they would gear it for less torque so you don't snap the cable. Drum units do benefit from the rotating mass which does decline the further you go out.


I have a general speedrooter 92 and it weighs 220lbs with 100' of 5/8" cable. With 100' of 3/4" it would be over 240lbs but our 3/4" drum is only 75'. For a long time I thought of adding another 25' of 5/8" but it's not too heavy to move now and I have relaxed a bit. If I can't get it at 100'(cleanouts are supposed to be every 90' or less) then I tell them to call someone else with a jetter.



After 100' you risk snapping the cable and have just enough torque left to cut medium roots. I have at times in the past swapped drums and run the 75' of 3/4" on the back of the 5/8" but the poor motor gets so hot and you can hear the whole thing straining. It will do it if you really need to but I wouldn't advise it.


Our sectional is only like 110' anyway so I don't ever use it.










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Old 07-25-2019, 10:24 PM   #15
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I find most of the sewer lines in my area average about 9 feet.



9 feet deep in virginia??!!?!?!?!?!?! Do you guys even get frost? Why the F would they bury them so deep???












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Old 07-25-2019, 10:40 PM   #16
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The main difference in available torque is the way it's applied.
With the sectional I've found that sometimes if I try to torque through the blockage it will start slipping. Sometimes I have to lean heavily on the handle to apply maximum torque. Even with a new clutch.
With the drum all I have to do is keep pressing down on the pedal and the torque continues to build. Both my machines have inner drums which are helpful with limiting flipping or snapping cables. They're not exactly foolproof. I've seen many new guys flip and snap cables with those machines.
I'm guessing with 3/4" inner core cable that is far less likely to happen. I've only run 11/16" hollow core since I find it to have the perfect balance of strength and flexibility. I can do 3" and 4" with no problems. I've been using the same cable for around 5 years. It's all about not abusing the cables and drying them off so they don't rust.
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Old 07-25-2019, 10:41 PM   #17
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I find most of the sewer lines in my area average about 9 feet.



9 feet deep in virginia??!!?!?!?!?!?! Do you guys even get frost? Why the F would they bury them so deep???












.
A lot of the houses have basements.
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Old 07-26-2019, 11:18 AM   #18
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9 feet deep in virginia??!!?!?!?!?!?! Do you guys even get frost? Why the F would they bury them so deep???












.








I believe not only does VA get frost, but snowfall as well.

Even N. Florida gets snow flurries some winters.
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