Long Stem ball valve - Plumbing Zone - Professional Plumbers Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!

Go Back   Plumbing Zone - Professional Plumbers Forum > Plumbing Forum > General Plumbing Discussion


Like Tree33Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-03-2019, 05:35 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 57

View jakewilcox's Photo Album My Photos
Default Long Stem ball valve

Hello all,


I'm new here. I am a journeyman from the San Francisco Bay Area. Normally we don't have to worry about freezing around here, mains are shallow we don't need to worry about freezing hose bibs and what not.


I have a FUNKY mountain cabin up in the Sierra Nevadas. We keep the water off in the cabin and haven't had any trouble with freezing pipes. I have been turning the water off at the meter because I'm afraid the water service will freeze and cause trouble. Last year, with like 6 feet of snow on the ground, I had to dig the meter box out to turn the water on; and literally gave my self a hernia doing so (yes, make fun of me... I deserve it). So, here is my question (I am embarrassed about this!): Do any of the folk who are in cold weather, have an idea bout how to make a valve stem longer or it stick up above the ground surface so that I don't have to dig out all of that snow? Something like the field spigots (not sure what they are called) I see around?


I had thought about putting a little shed type thing over the meter box, but then I need something on the handle to actuate the valve. I would rather stay away from the pneumatic/ electric route; it's just too expensive.


How do people handle this situation where it freezes more often?


THANK YOU IN ADVANCE!
jakewilcox is offline   Reply With Quote

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. PlumbingZone.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-03-2019, 08:15 PM   #2
Moderator Wizard
 
Tango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Québec
Posts: 6,638

View Tango's Photo Album My Photos
Default

...
Attached Thumbnails
Long Stem ball valve-13-14-.jpg  

MASTRPLUMB likes this.
Tango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2019, 08:58 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
The Dane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: NW Minnesota
Posts: 1,068

View The Dane's Photo Album My Photos
Default

I have seen video of this crazy thing were you guys in warmer climates have the meter and valves outside and maybe a foot underground. Here in cold north west minnesota the water service is at least 7' underground and there is a curbstop valve like in that picture above and you put a long key down and turn it on or off and then the meter is inside the house.

Sent from my BLN-L24 using Tapatalk
MASTRPLUMB likes this.
The Dane is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-03-2019, 08:59 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
ShtRnsdownhill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 7,964

View ShtRnsdownhill's Photo Album My Photos
Default

like a long stemmed rose....16 years in the plumbing industry and you never did a water main? what kind of shutoff do you use on water services to houses or buildings?
MASTRPLUMB likes this.
__________________
You cant cure stupid, only kill it..
ShtRnsdownhill is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2019, 02:59 AM   #5
Plumbing since 1974
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lafayette, (SF Bay Area) California
Posts: 114

View breplum's Photo Album My Photos
Default

ShtR, the curb meter box is typically a concrete Cristy box no deeper than 12".
12" earth cover minimum is code as per Calif P Code. UPC allows type M copper for residential underground.
The utility stop is just a slotted brass quarter turn valve, and a meter key is upside down U shaped welded to T handle ~30" long.
MASTRPLUMB likes this.
__________________
Marc Brenner Company
Lafayette, CA

925 283-3408
breplum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2019, 04:48 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
ShtRnsdownhill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 7,964

View ShtRnsdownhill's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by breplum View Post
ShtR, the curb meter box is typically a concrete Cristy box no deeper than 12".
12" earth cover minimum is code as per Calif P Code. UPC allows type M copper for residential underground.
The utility stop is just a slotted brass quarter turn valve, and a meter key is upside down U shaped welded to T handle ~30" long.

wow...im in the northeast..nothing less than 4ft down for the frost....
MASTRPLUMB likes this.
__________________
You cant cure stupid, only kill it..
ShtRnsdownhill is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2019, 07:52 PM   #7
Moderator Wizard
 
Tango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Québec
Posts: 6,638

View Tango's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by breplum View Post
ShtR, the curb meter box is typically a concrete Cristy box no deeper than 12".
12" earth cover minimum is code as per Calif P Code. UPC allows type M copper for residential underground.
The utility stop is just a slotted brass quarter turn valve, and a meter key is upside down U shaped welded to T handle ~30" long.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShtRnsdownhill View Post
wow...im in the northeast..nothing less than 4ft down for the frost....
1 foot and 4 feet are for warm blooded mammals! Nothing less than 7-8 feet for the frost.
Tango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2019, 10:09 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Debo22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 2,555

View Debo22's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jakewilcox View Post
Hello all,


I'm new here. I am a journeyman from the San Francisco Bay Area. Normally we don't have to worry about freezing around here, mains are shallow we don't need to worry about freezing hose bibs and what not.


I have a FUNKY mountain cabin up in the Sierra Nevadas. We keep the water off in the cabin and haven't had any trouble with freezing pipes. I have been turning the water off at the meter because I'm afraid the water service will freeze and cause trouble. Last year, with like 6 feet of snow on the ground, I had to dig the meter box out to turn the water on; and literally gave my self a hernia doing so (yes, make fun of me... I deserve it). So, here is my question (I am embarrassed about this!): Do any of the folk who are in cold weather, have an idea bout how to make a valve stem longer or it stick up above the ground surface so that I don't have to dig out all of that snow? Something like the field spigots (not sure what they are called) I see around?


I had thought about putting a little shed type thing over the meter box, but then I need something on the handle to actuate the valve. I would rather stay away from the pneumatic/ electric route; it's just too expensive.


How do people handle this situation where it freezes more often?


THANK YOU IN ADVANCE!
I’m from Orange County, California so I don’t deal with freezing temperatures either. My brother has a cabin in Big Bear California and keeps the water shutoff when no one is there also. He has a stop and waste valve in the front yard about 3-4 feet down that we turn off with a long stick that has a meter key attachment on the end. We don’t do full winterization, we shut it off and open faucets to let the water drain.

I’d recommend talking to some of the neighbors there and gain some local knowledge of what they are using. Since you’re a journeyman you’ll be able to install what they are using to make your life easier.

My knowledge is pretty limited on the freezing issue though.
Plumbus, chonkie, Tango and 1 others like this.
Debo22 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2019, 10:16 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 124

View MASTRPLUMB's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
1 foot and 4 feet are for warm blooded mammals! Nothing less than 7-8 feet for the frost.
I am from So. CA. myself, but back in 1998-2000, I was working in the
Spokane, WA. area where they are 5-6 deep, sometimes located in
a Manhole.,
MASTRPLUMB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2019, 10:20 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 124

View MASTRPLUMB's Photo Album My Photos
Exclamation

In SO. Ca. not only is the water service only about 12" deep,
But also I have seen sewer lines coming out 12" deep,
But I also seen them as deep as 6' or 7' just outside the foundation
Debo22 likes this.
MASTRPLUMB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | ElectricianTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PaintTalk.com | RoofingTalk.com