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Old 08-31-2019, 09:36 PM   #1
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Default I'm so confused about pumps!

Hi everyone! Iím working more and more around pumps these days and it seems like I keep getting conflicting information about how to use them depending on who I talk to. It feels like the journeymen I work with all have different rules around pumps, which ones need priming, and when and where you can use them. Iím looking for advice, or maybe some books to read, or resources to seek out, even courses to take, so that I can get good solid information about all the kinds of pumps we work with. Here are a couple of examples:

1.When I wanted to pump a bucket of glycol into an empty pipe system made of 6 inch steel all I had to use was a piston pump. It was rated for 2.2 gpm and had a max psi of 500. I know itís used as a booster pump to raise system pressures for testing but I figured I could pump a bucket with it. It would be slow compared to a centrifical pump but I thought it would still work. I was reprimanded by a journeyman who told me that piston pumps are only for transferring liquids into full systems. Is this true? Also no one primes the piston pump but I thought they needed priming regardless unless designed as ďself priming.Ē Is this true? Or are all piston pumps self priming?

2.A coworker thought the impeller of a circulation pump wasnít working or at least not producing flow. The motor looked like it was turning. Itís a mounted portable unit used for cleaning systems before glycol goes in. I thought we could prove that the impeller was working by simply pulling water out of a bucket and into another with the circulator so that we could see the flow. A third journeyman showed up and basically called me stupid. Basically he said that circulators donít pump. They just sit in line with a system and push water around. I tried to explain that itís still a centrifical pump but simply low powered compared to what you would use to transfer fluids or boost pressure. I felt that even a circulator will still draw water from a bucket as long as itís primed and not being forced to lift very high. Am I stupid or was the journeyman wrong about circulators?
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Old 08-31-2019, 11:37 PM   #2
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you need to do some reading and research of pumps on your own, this is basic knowledge you should have..
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Old 09-01-2019, 09:36 AM   #3
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Buy the books and study then you'll have your answers.
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Old 09-01-2019, 01:47 PM   #4
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Yall must have missed the sentence where the OP was asking about what would be a good book, resource or even classes to take so he can get good information, since it seems like he is getting conflicting info from coworkers. If he's learning the basics from other Jmen and getting conflicting info, why wouldn't coming here looking for help on what books or resources be a good idea? Kinda thought that's what the site is for, pros in the industry to help each other.
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Old 09-01-2019, 02:34 PM   #5
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WHAT ONE POST IN TWO YEARS ?

What is your background ? What is your plumbing rating ? How many years ?
Are you even a real plumber ?
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Old 09-01-2019, 02:56 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chonkie View Post
Yall must have missed the sentence where the OP was asking about what would be a good book, resource or even classes to take so he can get good information, since it seems like he is getting conflicting info from coworkers. If he's learning the basics from other Jmen and getting conflicting info, why wouldn't coming here looking for help on what books or resources be a good idea? Kinda thought that's what the site is for, pros in the industry to help each other.
Seems like I skipped where he asked for a good book. oops.
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Old 09-01-2019, 03:07 PM   #7
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Check with a friend that's a Millrite, or industrial Mechanic. They take a lot of courses in pumps and fluid handling, they can recommend books.

A long time ago when I was going to college, it was part of the plumbers & pipefitters training. I don't hear much about it now.

Don't we need apprentices here, Guys. Give them a break, no question is a stupid question.
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Old 09-01-2019, 03:20 PM   #8
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I’ve read “Pumping Away” by Dan Holohan, looked into a number of manuals for the pumps we use, searched youtube videos and online guides, and they all have the same problem. They focus on one specific aspect of the pump in question and don’t address the practical questions I’m asking. No book will say a piston pump shouldn’t be used for this or that, instead, it will only tell you where they are most effective. So the literature I’ve looked into doesn’t seem to have the answers I’m looking for. If you know of books that address this better could you recommend them or do you actually know any? Or have even read any books at all?

My next question is for this site and forum in general. What exactly is your goal here?
When I browse the questions on this forum I see very little helpful advice. Just more of the same journeyman grand standing. You mostly are acting knowledgeable but really you are completely hollow in terms of real advice or help. Every time I try to use this site it’s a big let down. This is not a supportive community of tradesmen teaching and passing on tips but instead a group of back-patters self congratulating each other on how much wiser they are then the people asking questions. This is not a good community for seeking out the experience of people in this trade. So honestly I’m asking. What is the point of this forum? It’s clearly not to encourage and help your fellow tradesmen. So what is it?

For those who have voiced this already thank you. I appreciate the advice about asking other trades. I'll try that for sure.
I'm a new Journeyman and my background is in residential, commercial, and industrial plumbing and pipe fitting. I actually have a wide variety of experience just not a lot of time logged yet as a journeyman.
As for why I don't post often... well I address that in the beginning of the reply. Not a lot of professionals giving advice and instead a lot of journeyman trying to show how important they are.
Remember we live in the age of google. Assume that the people here have already done the google searches and what we're actually looking for here is practical guidance from people who may have already come up against the same dead end in their research.
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Old 09-01-2019, 04:13 PM   #9
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First, I don't think that many members of this forum check in very often.
So, mostly you see just the active checker-inners posting.
In my 45 years in the plumbing trades, and most colleagues working residential and light commercial in the metro areas, we only deal with limited pump issues.

So, sorry, but no surprise that there are no real answers (yet/ever) to your question.
In the past when I have a pump question, I start with the pertinent rep...in many cases that is the Grundfos rep, and after that, directly with a pump manufacturing company tech desk.
In a lot of large multi -storey buildings, mechanical engineers always have more to contribute than the plumbers, bc they are trained to a higher level.
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Old 09-01-2019, 06:36 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastWestPlumber View Post
Iíve read ďPumping AwayĒ by Dan Holohan, looked into a number of manuals for the pumps we use, searched youtube videos and online guides, and they all have the same problem. They focus on one specific aspect of the pump in question and donít address the practical questions Iím asking. No book will say a piston pump shouldnít be used for this or that, instead, it will only tell you where they are most effective. So the literature Iíve looked into doesnít seem to have the answers Iím looking for. If you know of books that address this better could you recommend them or do you actually know any? Or have even read any books at all?

My next question is for this site and forum in general. What exactly is your goal here?
When I browse the questions on this forum I see very little helpful advice. Just more of the same journeyman grand standing. You mostly are acting knowledgeable but really you are completely hollow in terms of real advice or help. Every time I try to use this site itís a big let down. This is not a supportive community of tradesmen teaching and passing on tips but instead a group of back-patters self congratulating each other on how much wiser they are then the people asking questions. This is not a good community for seeking out the experience of people in this trade. So honestly Iím asking. What is the point of this forum? Itís clearly not to encourage and help your fellow tradesmen. So what is it?

For those who have voiced this already thank you. I appreciate the advice about asking other trades. I'll try that for sure.
I'm a new Journeyman and my background is in residential, commercial, and industrial plumbing and pipe fitting. I actually have a wide variety of experience just not a lot of time logged yet as a journeyman.
As for why I don't post often... well I address that in the beginning of the reply. Not a lot of professionals giving advice and instead a lot of journeyman trying to show how important they are.
Remember we live in the age of google. Assume that the people here have already done the google searches and what we're actually looking for here is practical guidance from people who may have already come up against the same dead end in their research.
The piston pump you talked about is slow, it also puts up too much pressure. If you are on a low pressure system you can blow a line or something.

Don't think you'll never do it. Someone can ask for help for a minute and you go and are gone for an hour. Bang you've blown a pipe or fitting.

The centrifugal pump will move the fluid in a good rate of flow. But if you have to pressure up very high it's not as good.

I have been around for a while and don't post that often. Your second issue, you could be correct. This site has been flooded with a lot of bovine excrement over the last while.
We used to help each other more than chew the rag and talk politics.
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