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Old 12-29-2015, 12:06 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by ace4548
The pace really depends on the boss you have and the job... When we do a shut down at a factory it's 12 hrs a day non stop, sometimes it's 16+hrs a day. Usually if we are doing a big steam job or water heaters my journeyman will tell me how many hours the job was bid for, and we pace ourselves accordingly ... The other journeyman doesn't work hard, but wants everything done fast no matter what. I prefer slow and steady. Someday I hope to get into the light commercial side and do bathrooms at fast food places, supermarkets etc.. Then maybe transition to service..
That's industrial though and the pace is a little slower due to all the safety measures you have to take.
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Old 12-29-2015, 12:32 PM   #22
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Lol the always 3 weeks behind is so true.. There hasn't been a job I have worked on yet, that has been completed on time... And every one of them my boss lost money lol... The pace can be slowed by saftey precautions , and also the size of pipe you are hanging.. There has been days we only got 20 ft up, had to use a chain fall to lift up the sections.
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Old 12-29-2015, 12:47 PM   #23
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I've applied for a couple jobs but have been turned away due to a lack of residential experience. How different and what are the major differences between commercial/ industrial work and residential?











With residential, there will definitely be nitpicky snippy customers who are angry at you when you give them the price. You have to be able to handle that. I have known some crusty old plumbers who prefer new construction because they are not good communicators. So they don't want to deal with customers.

Also, in residential service, since you will be going into people's homes, you may have to remove your boots, or put shoe coverings on; you have to lay down drop cloths {I use a small red carpet that I roll out to lay down on} to protect floors and cabinets; you may have pets or children to deal with. It can be different then just going to a bank's restroom and augering a toilet.

I work clean and neat. Another thing, clean up all your trash and take it with you. One time, I replaced a food waste grinder {garbage disposal} for a customer. While leaving, I noticed the re-cycle bins outside at the curb. It was trash day. So I dumped the disposal in the blue re-cycle bin. Don't you know halfway back to the shop, dispatch calls me and says I need to head back to the customer's house and get the old disposal. I felt like saying to the customer "What's the big deal if I dropped it in the re-cycle bin?"....but you can't say anything. Can you deal with that kind of stuff? Some guys don't want to deal with that.
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Old 12-30-2015, 12:26 PM   #24
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With residential, there will definitely be nitpicky snippy customers who are angry at you when you give them the price. You have to be able to handle that. I have known some crusty old plumbers who prefer new construction because they are not good communicators. So they don't want to deal with customers. Also, in residential service, since you will be going into people's homes, you may have to remove your boots, or put shoe coverings on; you have to lay down drop cloths {I use a small red carpet that I roll out to lay down on} to protect floors and cabinets; you may have pets or children to deal with. It can be different then just going to a bank's restroom and augering a toilet. I work clean and neat. Another thing, clean up all your trash and take it with you. One time, I replaced a food waste grinder {garbage disposal} for a customer. While leaving, I noticed the re-cycle bins outside at the curb. It was trash day. So I dumped the disposal in the blue re-cycle bin. Don't you know halfway back to the shop, dispatch calls me and says I need to head back to the customer's house and get the old disposal. I felt like saying to the customer "What's the big deal if I dropped it in the re-cycle bin?"....but you can't say anything. Can you deal with that kind of stuff? Some guys don't want to deal with that.
You deal with most of that in commercial service and tenant work as well.
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Old 02-06-2016, 09:50 AM   #25
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In NYC repair/jobbing service has become a horror show. lead paint laws put us at risk for Huge federal fines. New work does not have this problem. I do everything, and can say that Jobbing/repair work can be more profitable for the business owner however. as well as Boiler repair/replacements. Their are no estimates like larger scaled New construction. They may have 10 estimates or more to contend with. However. the flip side is. knowledge and experience is important.
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Old 02-06-2016, 11:16 AM   #26
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I've applied for a couple jobs but have been turned away due to a lack of residential experience. How different and what are the major differences between commercial/ industrial work and residential?
How do you show up at the job interviews? appearance both clothing and attitude...how do you come across the person your talking to for the job? the I know it all and can do everything? or the I have experience in this, and give examples, with the finish of Im eager to learn and do more..will a boss figure , this guy is going to be tough to have him do things OUR way...I have worked for many plumbers and still am learning new stuff now, with all the advancements in technology..A boss doesnt want to think it will be a fight to get an employee to conform to the shop your working in..people skills are the hardest to learn and master and are the ones that will take you further than knowledge of the work, but you still need to know those skills too...
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Old 02-06-2016, 04:15 PM   #27
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Lol the always 3 weeks behind is so true.. There hasn't been a job I have worked on yet, that has been completed on time... And every one of them my boss lost money lol... The pace can be slowed by saftey precautions , and also the size of pipe you are hanging.. There has been days we only got 20 ft up, had to use a chain fall to lift up the sections.

Every commercial contractor I ever worked for never made any money on a job. "Just hoping to make enough on this one to keep the doors open.". Bahaha
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