Cider - Page 5 - Plumbing Zone - Professional Plumbers Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!

Go Back   Plumbing Zone - Professional Plumbers Forum > Plumbing Community > Off Topic (Non Trade)


Like Tree43Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-19-2018, 10:28 PM   #41
Super Moderator
 
OpenSights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Grand Ledge, MI
Posts: 5,344

View OpenSights's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShtRnsdownhill View Post
do you have a meat grinder? if so use that, if not and your thinking of buying one it works great on apples, not as fast as the garbage disposal unit on the video, but you can also grind meat or anything in it..you can get a good decent size for a few hundred..
True. Usually you can find them cheap at goodwill for $5 or so.
OpenSights is offline   Reply With Quote

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. PlumbingZone.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-02-2018, 01:32 PM   #42
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: California
Posts: 1,275

View Alan's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Got a motor off of an old jet pump.



I'm guessing the disposer is going to be the tough part.
OpenSights likes this.
__________________
Journeyman Plumber
Alan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2018, 04:50 PM   #43
Super Moderator
 
OpenSights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Grand Ledge, MI
Posts: 5,344

View OpenSights's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Most of the cider we pressed this year weíve drink after boiling. I had 3 gallons set aside hoping to eventually make a 5 gallon batch of hard cider and even though I treated it with campden tablets it still caught an infection, so that will probably end up being vinegar.

Yesterday I picked up a nice refrigerator from a new landlord for $40. I thought I was going to lowball her at I thought I was going to lowball her at $50, but she came up with the price. Thinking of selling my kegerator and converting the fridge. Iíll also have room next year for the cider so it doesnít go bad.
Attached Thumbnails
Cider-fbd414b7-8f86-440b-8d02-bec4adeeee18.jpg  

Cider-a2c23a95-9b27-4530-92f8-971264a9f487.jpg  

OpenSights is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-02-2018, 06:14 PM   #44
Senior Member
 
ShtRnsdownhill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 5,849

View ShtRnsdownhill's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by OpenSights View Post
Most of the cider we pressed this year weíve drink after boiling. I had 3 gallons set aside hoping to eventually make a 5 gallon batch of hard cider and even though I treated it with campden tablets it still caught an infection, so that will probably end up being vinegar.

Yesterday I picked up a nice refrigerator from a new landlord for $40. I thought I was going to lowball her at I thought I was going to lowball her at $50, but she came up with the price. Thinking of selling my kegerator and converting the fridge. Iíll also have room next year for the cider so it doesnít go bad.
why do you boil the cider? cant you just put in fridge or boiling and packing hot lets it stay out of the fridge?
OpenSights likes this.
ShtRnsdownhill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2018, 07:30 PM   #45
Super Moderator
 
OpenSights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Grand Ledge, MI
Posts: 5,344

View OpenSights's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Pasteurization. You need to kill the wild yeast and whatever natural bacteria that is present. Sure, it’s safe if you’re going to drink it over the next few days, but even refrigerated the wild yeast can start to ferment and bacteria can still grow causing off flavors and possibly make you sick.

When I talk about boiling, just bring it to a boil, once reached, flameout.

Now if you want to ferment and make hard cider, most of your commercial yeasts will devour wild yeast. If you plan on keeping it at a fermentable temperature it’s best to treat with 1 crushed campden tablet per gallon 24 hours prior to pitching your yeast and adding yeast nutrient and petic enzyme.

We have a local convenience store chain who uses uv light to pasteurize their cider. Perfectly good for fermentation. Last year I bought ten gallons to experiment with. One five gallon batch took about six months to age!

Boiling or any other preservatives will mess with the starches and sugars that your army of bugs (yeast) need to pee alcohol and fart cO2.

If anyone is interested in learning about making hard cider just let me know. I find it much easier than brewing or wine making. Using a hydrometer took me a bit to wrap my head around when measuring OG and FG, but once you learn how to read it the math is easy to figure out your ABV. I prefer to drop my gravity to .998 or less making it on the dry side. You can back sweeten, but I’d have to look up how.
OpenSights is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2018, 10:09 PM   #46
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: California
Posts: 1,275

View Alan's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by OpenSights View Post
If anyone is interested in learning about making hard cider just let me know. I find it much easier than brewing or wine making. Using a hydrometer took me a bit to wrap my head around when measuring OG and FG, but once you learn how to read it the math is easy to figure out your ABV. I prefer to drop my gravity to .998 or less making it on the dry side. You can back sweeten, but Iíd have to look up how.
My wife would love that. I already have a lot of brewing equipment from my beer making days.
OpenSights likes this.
__________________
Journeyman Plumber
Alan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2018, 11:09 PM   #47
Super Moderator
 
OpenSights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Grand Ledge, MI
Posts: 5,344

View OpenSights's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan View Post
My wife would love that. I already have a lot of brewing equipment from my beer making days.
Well than you have a huge advantage! Fermentation, and the equipment are very similar. Fermentation bucket with an airlock, auto siphon or racking cane to transfer to secondary if you care about clarifying, bottling bucket or keg, co2...

The process is very similar and actually much easier with much less caution regarding contamination. For example, any brewer would never pull a sample of beer to take a gravity reading and dump it back into the fermenter, with cider and wine itís perfectly fine to do so... properly cleaned and sanitization techniques obviously need to be practiced.

Thereís no boil, no steeping of grains, just your ingredients, let it ferment, add priming sugar if bottling or with kegging you can force carb. I havenít mastered force carbing so usually I just use priming sugar.

As itís cider season, now is the time to search out pasteurized not by heat or chemical locally. The convenience store chain around here I mentioned charges $4/gallon when you buy two gallons.... probably half of what youíll pay in Cali.

In the off season you can buy kits. Iíve had great success with those! Other than a couple of weeks for carbonation, thereís no aging time.

Iím going to add three screen shots from a digital book I have on a basic, plane cider. Might not come up in order....Use it as a starting point. If you want blueberry apple cider, add blueberry juice, or buy frozen blueberries, thaw, purťe add to a grain sack and add to secondary. Goes for any fruit. I did a cherry cider from a kit, kegged it, didnít taste very cherry. Cracked the keg and added organic tart cherry concentrate. Turned out awesome!

Early this summer I bought a dry hopped cider from a local cider mill that was amazing! My best guess was centennial hops.

When you have some extra time for reading check out Homebrewtalk.com thereís an amazing wealth of knowledge on there! Recipes, different ideas...

Iíve been reading up on cysers... basically a cross between a hard cider and mead (a wine made from honey). I was gifted three gallons of honey from a maintenance guy at one of my pmcís. One gallon of honey, or 12lbs is enough to make 5 gallons of mead.

Let me know if youíre wife would like a certain flavor of cider and I can get you a recipe.

I made a one gallon batch of ginger cider that was amazing! Although I cheated and used an extract instead of making a ginger germ.
Attached Thumbnails
Cider-6d039773-6be1-4638-ba6b-acdec3c19407.jpg  

Cider-7919fae8-3c34-4178-8a35-a8edd15fbe0a.jpg  

Cider-c38359df-1538-4ed5-af65-544cc405ec5f.jpg  

OpenSights is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2018, 11:14 PM   #48
Super Moderator
 
OpenSights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Grand Ledge, MI
Posts: 5,344

View OpenSights's Photo Album My Photos
Default

The yeast strain depends on your taste. For my ciders I’ve had good luck with champagne yeast! OG ~1.070-1.085, FG .098. Nice and dry.
OpenSights is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2018, 11:16 AM   #49
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: California
Posts: 1,275

View Alan's Photo Album My Photos
Default

We don't have a lot of variety around here when it comes to ciders. I think right now she's on the marionberry stuff from two towns.


She also really likes sour beer but that's a completely different conversation.

Sounds like i've got my work cut out for me next summer.
OpenSights likes this.
__________________
Journeyman Plumber
Alan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2018, 12:17 PM   #50
Super Moderator
 
OpenSights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Grand Ledge, MI
Posts: 5,344

View OpenSights's Photo Album My Photos
Default

I didnít try a sour until I joined my club. While I appreciate the experience, diversity and palette experience, beyond a sample is too much for me! Another example, I love stouts and porters. I picked up a 4 pack of toasted marshmallow stout. Love the mouth feel, aroma.... but a 20oz can lasts me about six hours!

If you have some of those natural/organic stores like Whole Foods you can buy fresh organic apple juice and even mix other juices in too. They might cost $5/half gallon, just spend $10 and experiment with a 1 gallon batch. Make sure you buy a one gallon carboy and leave enough headspace! Iíd skip and airlock and use a blowoff tube in the bunghole into a mason jar of water/star-san otherwise things can get messy. Iíve made some Irish stouts that are extremely active for a few days. Learned quickly that if youíre not prepared the mess can take hours to clean up once you get home!
Attached Thumbnails
Cider-393500ca-3ccc-46eb-9dea-f018f1740435.jpg  

OpenSights is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | ElectricianTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PaintTalk.com | RoofingTalk.com