oops, looks like gas company gona pay... - Page 2 - Plumbing Zone - Professional Plumbers Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!

Go Back   Plumbing Zone - Professional Plumbers Forum > Plumbing Tools, Products & Safety > Plumbing Safety


Like Tree21Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-12-2018, 12:22 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 2,783

View justme's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tommy plumber View Post
I can understand a regulator not holding high pressure, but pipe is pipe. A steel pipe shouldn't break apart if pressure goes from 1 psi to 65 psi.


Something doesn't add up with this scenario. I don't think that we have enough facts.
The pipe isn't the problem it is the old ass fittings that haven't been pressure tested in forever.
justme is offline   Reply With Quote

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. PlumbingZone.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-12-2018, 01:34 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
ShtRnsdownhill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 4,543

View ShtRnsdownhill's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by justme View Post
The pipe isn't the problem it is the old ass fittings that haven't been pressure tested in forever.



no it wasnt the fittings either, it was all the regulators on the gas equipment that were only designed for 1/2 psi, so all the diaphragms or springs to regulate the small 1/2 psi of pressure were blown out with 95+ psi and aloud the gas to just fill the houses with gas till ignition and BOOM!!!!
most pipe and fittings can withstand hundreds of PSI and be fine...
MACPLUMB777 likes this.
__________________
You cant cure stupid, only kill it..
ShtRnsdownhill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2018, 06:37 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
plumbdrum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Ma
Posts: 2,863

View plumbdrum's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShtRnsdownhill View Post
no it wasnt the fittings either, it was all the regulators on the gas equipment that were only designed for 1/2 psi, so all the diaphragms or springs to regulate the small 1/2 psi of pressure were blown out with 95+ psi and aloud the gas to just fill the houses with gas till ignition and BOOM!!!!
most pipe and fittings can withstand hundreds of PSI and be fine...


All piping systems were tested prior to going back into service, some systems were probably already leaking and were totally replaced.

For a little while, existing CSST was not allowed to be reused until verifications from manufacturers.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
MACPLUMB777 likes this.
plumbdrum is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-12-2018, 07:19 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
ShtRnsdownhill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 4,543

View ShtRnsdownhill's Photo Album My Photos
Default

so whats the final official story on how the gas mains got over pressurized? or is that top secret never to be known?...lol
__________________
You cant cure stupid, only kill it..
ShtRnsdownhill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2018, 08:31 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
plumbdrum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Ma
Posts: 2,863

View plumbdrum's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShtRnsdownhill View Post
so whats the final official story on how the gas mains got over pressurized? or is that top secret never to be known?...lol


NTSB has taken over the investigation, more than likely human error.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
ShtRnsdownhill likes this.
plumbdrum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2019, 06:20 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
skoronesa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1,167

View skoronesa's Photo Album My Photos
Default

https://www.npr.org/2018/11/16/66861...osions-in-mass


Electronically controlled main distribution regulators opened way too much.



The guy in charge of replacing the lines shut off the flow of gas to the old cast iron line and thus the sensors which control the main distribution regulators. When he did so the sensors saw low pressure so they sent signals to the distribution hub and began opening the regulators all the way allowing high gas pressure into the still connected lines else where.











.
__________________
Want privacy from the diy/hacks? Too bad, the motherland has fallen, freedom is dead.
skoronesa is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to skoronesa For This Useful Post:
MASTRPLUMB (05-26-2019)
Old 05-25-2019, 06:57 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
ShtRnsdownhill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 4,543

View ShtRnsdownhill's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by skoronesa View Post
https://www.npr.org/2018/11/16/66861...osions-in-mass


Electronically controlled main distribution regulators opened way too much.



The guy in charge of replacing the lines shut off the flow of gas to the old cast iron line and thus the sensors which control the main distribution regulators. When he did so the sensors saw low pressure so they sent signals to the distribution hub and began opening the regulators all the way allowing high gas pressure into the still connected lines else where.











.

it still came down to human error...and they will pay out alot in lawsuits..
skoronesa and MASTRPLUMB like this.
__________________
You cant cure stupid, only kill it..
ShtRnsdownhill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2019, 08:12 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
skoronesa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1,167

View skoronesa's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Yeah, apparently expected to hit $1 Billion


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merrim...gas_explosions








.
GAN and MASTRPLUMB like this.
__________________
Want privacy from the diy/hacks? Too bad, the motherland has fallen, freedom is dead.
skoronesa is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to skoronesa For This Useful Post:
Tommy plumber (05-26-2019)
Old 05-26-2019, 09:59 AM   #19
Moderator
 
Tommy plumber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Florida
Posts: 12,211

View Tommy plumber's Photo Album My Photos
Default

What a catastrophe.

Sensors allowing gas to increase pressure in the distribution lines due to sensing "0" psi.

This reminds me of some plane crashes. Sometimes a combination of faulty sensors coupled with human error brings planes down in a similar fashion.

The two Boeing Max airliners that recently crashed are thought to have had faulty sensors that when the plane was flying at level flight, the sensor was detecting that the plane was climbing at too steep of an angle and therefore pitched the nose down. But when already at level flight, pointing the nose down increases air speed and sets the plane on a collision course with the ground.

Imagine the pilots fighting to control the plane but can't. Like driving your car and it is speeding up all on its own and you can't slow the car down. Very scary.
__________________
Hire a licensed master plumber.
Tommy plumber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2019, 10:59 AM   #20
The Old (antique) Master
 
PLUMBER_BILL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: ALLENTOWN, PA
Posts: 2,210

View PLUMBER_BILL's Photo Album My Photos
Default gas lines bit of history

[QUOTE=Tommy plumber;1206730]What a catastrophe.

When I started this trade the Sawsall was -- yet to be invented. My boss told me as an apprentice never cut any pipe with a hack saw, pipe cutter or anything else until you are positive the line is turned off. In a house at that time there was a lot of steel pipe. As to gas there were gas ranges, refrigerators, dryers and yes there were gas lights. hot water was made using gas fired coils piped into range boilers. Most in wall gas piping had been cut in the basement and plugged shut, but in my early years in the trade I did find about 4 properties with live gas lines in the walls. You did not see a lot of gas for heating here in Allentown gas was a by-product of Bethlehem Steel's coke ovens and it was called manufactured gas. The next step was mixed gas, that was when natural gas made it's entry into the market.
GAN, skoronesa and Venomthirst like this.
__________________
Bill Parr LMP
www.parrsplumbing.net
For my alternate web site, click on ...
A little of this and a little of that
PLUMBER_BILL is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to PLUMBER_BILL For This Useful Post:
MASTRPLUMB (05-26-2019), Tommy plumber (05-27-2019)
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Work history and company reputation DarwinsFarm General Plumbing Discussion 52 08-13-2018 02:28 PM
Working for a big company or going out on your own? Help ! AlabamaPlumber Business, Marketing, and Sales 57 10-25-2016 11:46 PM
Property managment company Unclog1776 Drain and Sewer Cleaning 18 10-20-2015 09:03 AM
Finance Company Phat Cat Business, Marketing, and Sales 13 09-11-2015 06:24 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | ElectricianTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PaintTalk.com | RoofingTalk.com