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Old 11-29-2009, 05:10 PM   #11
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Talking running trap

[quote=PLUMBER_BILL;81104]
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Originally Posted by WestCoastPlumber View Post
Try installing a running trap on the main between the building sewer and the city tie in, this will help with the windy sewer Make sure u bring the cleanout to grade. You may tied on a high volume city main. Run your camera all the way down or check with the city public works dept.

Running trap ??? Then also a Fresh Air Inlet! Without the fresh air how would you get rid of the air between the body of water in the trap and the volume of water coming down the drain?
I thought about posting about a runing trap too.. we still see them on occasion.

wont all his revents in the system work as the fresh air inlets if he decides to install a runing trap??? Their should not be that much volume of water going down that stack to be a problem if it is properly re-vented..

It sounds like he already has a wind tunnel comming back from that sewer and it has got to be blasting out the roof vents ...

it seems like a reasonable idea,
if for no other reason just to keep the stink down up on the top floors of the building and in case any toilet seals come loose some day...

or maybe not...
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Old 12-16-2009, 01:37 PM   #12
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Default Suds back up

Does the condo have a two or single pipe drainage/vent system? If single pipe is it a provent or sovent system?
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Old 12-16-2009, 02:10 PM   #13
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Does the condo have a two or single pipe drainage/vent system? If single pipe is it a provent or sovent system?

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Old 12-19-2009, 10:51 PM   #14
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Delt with a simmilar issue a while ago. Auxilliary stacks were not installed and the basement bathrooms were connected too close to the bottom of the stack (containing suds). Rule of thumb here for high rises is your first horozontal connection should be 10' away from the stack.

No one wanted to spend money, so to solve the problem we installed check valves on the fixture outlet pipes for the sinks. Temporary solution that is still working.
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Old 12-20-2009, 08:01 PM   #15
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Delt with a simmilar issue a while ago. Auxilliary stacks were not installed and the basement bathrooms were connected too close to the bottom of the stack (containing suds). Rule of thumb here for high rises is your first horozontal connection should be 10' away from the stack.

No one wanted to spend money, so to solve the problem we installed check valves on the fixture outlet pipes for the sinks. Temporary solution that is still working.
This was from a year ago....I think he got it
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Old 05-12-2011, 09:32 AM   #16
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Default suds zones

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i am dealing with a 10 story building that is fairly new. They have been having laundry suds backing up from day one into a couple units at the bottom. I have already repiped some lines to create a "suds zone" and still having problems. The last time i was there i opened a cleanout and noticed a very strong wind traveling upstream through the pipe that i assume is coming from city sewer, the cleanout is near the exit of the building. Of course i can't see relief vents due to walls and ceilings and nobody wants their new condo ripped apart. There is relief vents shown on the blueprints. I was wondering why there is such a strong positive pressure coming upstream, constantly, and is that causing the suds to back up. This pressure is there even with very little water going down the drains. I don't think a p.a.p.a. Is the answer as this pressure is always present and not from "positive transients". Any thoughts would be welcome. Already snaked and camera the lines, everything is clear.
i thought sud zones exist at the base of waste and vent stacks;including at changes in directions in the house drain.installing a suds relief vent and running same to a non pressurized area is a solution but it involves opening of walls.you created a suds zone;what does that mean?the stacks create a negative pressure related to their height;(i.e. A chimney affect);is this the wind?i am wrestling with a similar problem in queens ny at a 32 story building.i am able to relocate the lowest apt to a two story stack picking up garage floor drains.the base of the laundry stack for 50 washing machines was loaded with grease which we cleaned.i think the suds form in the suds zones due to air under pressure that is not vented properly #1 and is then forced back up the waste and vent stacks along the sides of the piping causing the grease to froth,that is;form suds.if properly vented then the waste and vent system should be self cleaning.i think that the yoke vents weren't installed in my building.
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