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View Poll Results: As a Plumber I
use this daily 20 54.05%
don't use it, I'm a new construction plumber who doesn't care 16 43.24%
rely on the manufacture of supplier to have it on parts 17 45.95%
have never used this product, have no clue what it is 16 43.24%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 37. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-20-2013, 12:59 PM   #1
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Default Food Grade Silicone - Plumber's Grease

I just bought enough of this product to last years, in 4oz. aluminum squeeze tubes. Dawn dish detergent along with hot water will clean off anything this product comes in contact with.


For years, literally years (13+) I've been using this product. I started off using the regular grease that backfired instantly, would get hot in the truck during warmer climate months and make a huge mess.

The clear silicone I'd use only for in contact with potable water, the others for threaded connections that were 'not' in contact with potable water (petroleum base, ruins O-rings and all things rubber) and over the years they've made much improvement to that product.

When I started buying the FDA approved product in the super small containers, it was like trying to spread gelatin, spreadability was terrible and wouldn't get to the locations (thread patterns, slide patterns) to get the lubrication needed.

This product has improved, and then last year a guy gave me a half a tube of this product he used as a vendor in the festival biz that was required/approved by the health department. It is different than the Danco product or what's sold at the supply houses, has a little more greasier texture and it will spread to anything and anywhere you need it. Made for direct contact with food, you can spray off/clean surfaces with this product on there and it will remain with its ability to serve as its function.


This was a great habit that was taught to me by a service plumber in Cincinnati Ohio that has me following this ritual continually on a daily basis, respecting the trade, the next guy, the property owner when the time comes to work on the product in the fixture and have a chance to get it loose.


I put this on the shanks of new faucets, any threaded connections including 3/8" nuts to angle/straight stops.

Any screw or nut assembly that has a history of coming into contact with waste or water, it goes on, down to the allen screws that hold faucet handles on. Spreading enough to fill the hole where the allen key goes into, saves headaches years from now.

Same goes for aerators on faucets. Always.


99.99%, just like a Maury Povich show, new construction plumbers will not take the time and grease many components of faucets, shower valves, threaded connections during install because either they don't think the effort warrants the design, they don't get paid enough, or realize they won't be the ones coming back.


How do I know this?


Because I'm the guy who ALWAYS get the brunt of this inaction when it comes time to service these fixtures on the residential and commercial level of plumbing. But whether I'm coming back or not; I set it up for owner of that product to have a chance or another plumber to avoid the knuckle busting experience, sawing off or getting out grinders to remove old plumbing parts to install new.


It makes an incredible difference. I know this as I've spent a career of removing products that did not contain this penny's worth of lubrication that makes that first turn of a wrench a prolonged experience or a simple one. How many of you do this to brass pop up assemblies?

Don't answer; I already know. I'd give Moen top dog for credit for always supplying blister packs for their products, but it's ONLY done because their components HAVE to have that product in use, otherwise the product slowly locks up due to close tolerance of machining. Cue the removal tool made specific for the cartridges.

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Old 03-20-2013, 01:57 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DUNBAR PLUMBING View Post
I just bought enough of this product to last years, in 4oz. aluminum squeeze tubes. Dawn dish detergent along with hot water will clean off anything this product comes in contact with.

For years, literally years (13+) I've been using this product. I started off using the regular grease that backfired instantly, would get hot in the truck during warmer climate months and make a huge mess.

The clear silicone I'd use only for in contact with potable water, the others for threaded connections that were 'not' in contact with potable water (petroleum base, ruins O-rings and all things rubber) and over the years they've made much improvement to that product.

When I started buying the FDA approved product in the super small containers, it was like trying to spread gelatin, spreadability was terrible and wouldn't get to the locations (thread patterns, slide patterns) to get the lubrication needed.

This product has improved, and then last year a guy gave me a half a tube of this product he used as a vendor in the festival biz that was required/approved by the health department. It is different than the Danco product or what's sold at the supply houses, has a little more greasier texture and it will spread to anything and anywhere you need it. Made for direct contact with food, you can spray off/clean surfaces with this product on there and it will remain with its ability to serve as its function.

This was a great habit that was taught to me by a service plumber in Cincinnati Ohio that has me following this ritual continually on a daily basis, respecting the trade, the next guy, the property owner when the time comes to work on the product in the fixture and have a chance to get it loose.

I put this on the shanks of new faucets, any threaded connections including 3/8" nuts to angle/straight stops.

Any screw or nut assembly that has a history of coming into contact with waste or water, it goes on, down to the allen screws that hold faucet handles on. Spreading enough to fill the hole where the allen key goes into, saves headaches years from now.

Same goes for aerators on faucets. Always.

99.99%, just like a Maury Povich show, new construction plumbers will not take the time and grease many components of faucets, shower valves, threaded connections during install because either they don't think the effort warrants the design, they don't get paid enough, or realize they won't be the ones coming back.

How do I know this?

Because I'm the guy who ALWAYS get the brunt of this inaction when it comes time to service these fixtures on the residential and commercial level of plumbing. But whether I'm coming back or not; I set it up for owner of that product to have a chance or another plumber to avoid the knuckle busting experience, sawing off or getting out grinders to remove old plumbing parts to install new.

It makes an incredible difference. I know this as I've spent a career of removing products that did not contain this penny's worth of lubrication that makes that first turn of a wrench a prolonged experience or a simple one. How many of you do this to brass pop up assemblies?

Don't answer; I already know. I'd give Moen top dog for credit for always supplying blister packs for their products, but it's ONLY done because their components HAVE to have that product in use, otherwise the product slowly locks up due to close tolerance of machining. Cue the removal tool made specific for the cartridges.
You won't have any problem taking apart of any faucets or stops I've installed... yes, I greased or silicone grease everything. Was thought by a master repair plumber that specialized in two/three handles faucets 35 years ago.. I use 'slick and slide' from WB.
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Old 03-20-2013, 04:44 PM   #3
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That's how I roll. I use faucet grease on all threads at the industrial plants I work at. No one drinks the water, they have the 5 gallon jugs all over the place. At the commercial/institutional jobs, I use food grade silicone grease. I even grease the threads on all slip joints.
What makes it nice is when I come back for a service call, and everything unscrews. I have been doing a lot of Moen cartridge replacements for a big property management outfit, and most times I can't get the allen set screw out of the shower handle, and even some of the machine screws won't come.
It turns a 20 minute job into a big hassle.
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Old 03-20-2013, 05:12 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by 422 plumber View Post
most times I can't get the allen set screw out of the shower handle, and even some of the machine screws won't come.
Never tried this but it might be worth a shot. They make screwdriver attachments for soldering guns(electronic). I asked why and the store clerk said for frozen screws....heat them up, let it cool down and it's unfrozen....sounds good in theory, lol.
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Old 03-20-2013, 08:07 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DUNBAR PLUMBING View Post
I just bought enough of this product to last years, in 4oz. aluminum squeeze tubes. Dawn dish detergent along with hot water will clean off anything this product comes in contact with.


For years, literally years (13+) I've been using this product. I started off using the regular grease that backfired instantly, would get hot in the truck during warmer climate months and make a huge mess.

The clear silicone I'd use only for in contact with potable water, the others for threaded connections that were 'not' in contact with potable water (petroleum base, ruins O-rings and all things rubber) and over the years they've made much improvement to that product.

When I started buying the FDA approved product in the super small containers, it was like trying to spread gelatin, spreadability was terrible and wouldn't get to the locations (thread patterns, slide patterns) to get the lubrication needed.

This product has improved, and then last year a guy gave me a half a tube of this product he used as a vendor in the festival biz that was required/approved by the health department. It is different than the Danco product or what's sold at the supply houses, has a little more greasier texture and it will spread to anything and anywhere you need it. Made for direct contact with food, you can spray off/clean surfaces with this product on there and it will remain with its ability to serve as its function.


This was a great habit that was taught to me by a service plumber in Cincinnati Ohio that has me following this ritual continually on a daily basis, respecting the trade, the next guy, the property owner when the time comes to work on the product in the fixture and have a chance to get it loose.


I put this on the shanks of new faucets, any threaded connections including 3/8" nuts to angle/straight stops.

Any screw or nut assembly that has a history of coming into contact with waste or water, it goes on, down to the allen screws that hold faucet handles on. Spreading enough to fill the hole where the allen key goes into, saves headaches years from now.

Don't forget door handles.....
Same goes for aerators on faucets. Always.


99.99%, just like a Maury Povich show, new construction plumbers will not take the time and grease many components of faucets, shower valves, threaded connections during install because either they don't think the effort warrants the design, they don't get paid enough, or realize they won't be the ones coming back.
What does Maury Povich have to do with this? I don't see the connection. Or, maybe you're going behind a handy-man, not a new constuction plumber.

How do I know this?


Because I'm the guy who ALWAYS get the brunt of this inaction when it comes time to service these fixtures on the residential and commercial level of plumbing. But whether I'm coming back or not; I set it up for owner of that product to have a chance or another plumber to avoid the knuckle busting experience, sawing off or getting out grinders to remove old plumbing parts to install new.


It makes an incredible difference. I know this as I've spent a career of removing products that did not contain this penny's worth of lubrication that makes that first turn of a wrench a prolonged experience or a simple one. How many of you do this to brass pop up assemblies?
I do install brass p.o.'s sometimes...I hate the plastic ones.
Don't answer; I already know. I'd give Moen top dog for credit for always supplying blister packs for their products, but it's ONLY done because their components HAVE to have that product in use, otherwise the product slowly locks up due to close tolerance of machining. Cue the removal tool made specific for the cartridges.







...
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Old 03-20-2013, 08:08 PM   #6
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I use Dow 111 food grade silicone grease.






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Old 03-21-2013, 12:04 AM   #7
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Ok. Enlighten me. I obviously don't know my greases. I was told silicone grease
Goes on threads or o-rings that are not constantly moving. Plumbers grease on moving parts. Is this correct?
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Old 03-21-2013, 05:41 PM   #8
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image-713439965.jpg



image-1980515359.jpg




image-1270278759.jpg




Never again do I spend $3 like this, ever again.

I held onto the empty containers so I can refill with a tube and save money. Only took years to finally find this product in this amount.



image-1328186994.jpg

image-2783473667.jpg
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Old 03-21-2013, 05:56 PM   #9
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That's a whole lotta lube....
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Old 03-21-2013, 05:59 PM   #10
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That's a whole lotta lube....
Isn't that a Led Zep song?
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